Truth to Power, by James Thompson

It cannot have been easy to be the first reporter on the tragic scene at Aberfan. A vast slagheap of colliery spoil above a small Welsh mining village gave way in 1966, roaring down the valley and flattening the school and killing 116 children, and also destroying houses, killing 28 adults in all. When John…

Immigration and Teething Pains, by Fred Reed

I have often pointed out that the Dissident Right, fervently disliking Latinos, criticizes Hispanics for all sins real or imagined but never says what policies it favor toward the tens of millions American citizens of Latin-American descent. I have to retract. Recently John Derbyshire, the star writer at the anti-immigrant site Vdare.com, has stated clearly…

Israelis Have Shown Netanyahu the Door. Can He Inflict More Damage Before He Exits?, by Jonathan Cook

For most Israelis, the general election on Tuesday was about one thing and one thing only. Not the economy, nor the occupation, nor even corruption scandals. It was about Benjamin Netanyahu. Should he head yet another far-right government, or should his 10-year divisive rule come to an end? Barring a last-minute upset as the final…

The Israeli Elections: Who Cares?, by Israel Shamir

Israelis held new snap parliamentary elections, as the previous round in April had been inconclusive. Surprise! The new round has been also inconclusive. The voters could not make up their mind and choose between Tweedledum and Tweedledee, two major parties of little substantial difference. The only noticeable distinction is personal: one party, Likud, is lead…

Crises in the Middle-East and a Few Hopefully Useful Pointers, by The Saker

The Middle-East is literally exploding: the Houthis have delivered an extremely effective blow against Saudi oil production which (so they claim) has now dropped by 50% before bouncing back; there are persistent rumors that Russian Su-35S and S-400 have threatened to shoot down Israeli aircraft attacking Syria; Lebanon has declared that it will defend itself…

Family Misfortunes, by James Thompson

There is a popular genre of commentary which wishes to show that bright people make as many errors as less bright people, perhaps as a consequence of divine retribution. “Einstein made an error in maths which was spotted by a bus conductor” lifts the hearts of some readers. Of course, bright people make errors. Do…

Will Trump Take Neocon Bait and Attack Iran Over Saudi Strike?, by Ron Paul

The recent attacks on Saudi oil facilities by Yemeni Houthi forces demonstrate once again that an aggressive foreign policy often brings unintended consequences and can result in blowback. In 2015 Saudi Arabia attacked its neighbor, Yemen, because a coup in that country ousted the Saudi-backed dictator. Four years later Yemen is in ruins, with nearly…

Jews vs. Israelis, by Gilad Atzmon

Now would be the correct time for Ali Abunimah, JVP, & CO to form an orderly queue to issue their deep and sincere apology to me. Since the early 2000s my detractors within the so called Jewish ‘Left’ together with their sometime stooges, have been harassing me, my publishers and my readers for pointing out…

Race Denier Chanda Chisala Doesn’t Deserve His 15 Seconds of Twitter Fame, by Lance Welton

When will environmental determinists and science deniers finally admit that they’ve lost the argument? The evidence that there are black-white differences in IQ and that these are partly genetic in origin is overwhelming. A significant contribution has been made by Richard Lynn, who has been published on VDARE.com. Nevertheless, a race-denial article published late last…

Quotidian Sweat, by Linh Dinh

There is a dearth of writing about work, its variety, tedium and grind. This is understandable, since most writers have devoted much of their time to writing and reading, and not painting houses, cleaning toilets, washing dishes, planting crops or performing mind numbingly monotonous tasks on an assembly line, etc. This blind spot or ignorance…

The End of Israel, by Gilad Atzmon

The lesson to be drawn from the current Israeli political stalemate is that Israel is imploding, breaking into the elements it has never managed to integrate into one. The schism is no longer the more quotidian dichotomy of Ashkenazi vs. Arab Jews (aka Sephardim); this divide is ideological, religious, spiritual, political, ethnic and cultural. Nor…

When Americans Fell for the 9/11 Deception They Lost Their Country, by Paul Craig Roberts

Today is the 18 anniversary of 9/11, an event that has turned a once free America into a domestic police state and an international warmonger during the 21st century. America’s reputation has been shattered along with the Constitution, international law, and seven nations in whole or part. The massive crimes against the Bill of Rights…

World War Bibi, by Gilad Atzmon

Yesterday Netanyahu claimed he’d identified a third secret nuclear site in Iran where Iran allegedly “conducted experiments to develop nuclear weapons.” Yet, despite the hyperbole no one seemed to take Netanyahu seriously: the Israeli press was amused by the desperate election stunt. His political rivals mocked the Israeli PM and a few hours after Netanyahu’s…

Netanyahu Risks Triggering an Unwinnable War to Avoid Losing Election, by Jonathan Cook

Every Israeli prime minister – not least Benjamin Netanyahu – understands that a military entanglement with Hezbollah, Lebanon’s armed Shia movement on Israel’s northern border, is a dangerous wager, especially during an election campaign. It was Shimon Peres who lost to Netanyahu in 1996, weeks after the former prime minister had incensed Israel’s Palestinian minority…

Unused Militaries, by Fred Reed

For a couple of decades I covered the military for various publications, as for example the Washington Times and Harper’s, and wrote a military column for Universal Press Syndicate. I was following the time-honored principle of sensible reporters: “Ask not what you can do for journalism, but what journalism can do for you.” The military…

Family Fortunes, by James Thompson

“All happy families are alike” declaimed Tolstoy, so as to then add the equally unsubstantiated coda: “each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way”. Readers may say: “So true, so very true”, but that would be in the literary sense, in that if it sounds profound it is judged to be so. Like all…

9/11 After 18 Years, by Paul Craig Roberts

I would appreciate hearing from readers whether they have come across a report in the print, TV, or NPR media of the highly professional four-year investigation of WTC Building 7’s demise. The international team of civil engineers concluded that the official story of Building 7’s destruction is entirely false. I reported their findings here: I…

White-Latino Relations in America’s Southwest, by Patrick McDermott

Last year’s midterm election results were hardly unusual for a party holding the presidency. Similar electoral setbacks had occurred during the presidencies of Bill Clinton and Barack Obama. But this one was portrayed as if it were somehow unique — an explicit rejection of President Trump’s nationalist and anti-immigration policies. For some, the electoral losses…

9/11 and Jeffrey Epstein: Media Malfeasance on Steroids, by Kevin Barrett

As the 18th anniversary of 9/11 approached, the arrest and alleged suicide of Jeffrey Epstein made headlines—and raised questions about the credibility of official narratives. As Eric Rasmusen writes: “Everybody, it seems, in New York society knew by 2000 that Jeffrey Epstein and Ghislaine Maxwell were corrupting teenage girls, but the press wouldn’t cover it.”…

The Official Story of the Collapse of WTC Building 7 Lies in Ruins, by Paul Craig Roberts

A research team at the University of Alaska’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, led by Dr. Leroy Hulsey, Dr. Zhili Quan, and Professor Feng Xiao, Department of Civil Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, released yesterday for public comment their findings from a four-year study of the collapse of World Trade Center Building…

The Future of the Spectacle … or How the West Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Reality Police, by C.J. Hopkins

If you want a vision of the future, don’t imagine “a boot stamping on a human face — for ever,” as Orwell suggested in 1984. Instead, imagine that human face staring mesmerized into the screen of some kind of nifty futuristic device on which every word, sound, and image has been algorithmically approved for consumption…

Israel’s Many Wars, by Philip Giraldi

Two years ago I wrote an article entitled “America’s Jews Are Driving America’s Wars.” Though I made clear in the piece that I was writing about specific, identifiable Jews who fund and staff the think-tanks and foundations that make up the Israel Lobby, I was immediately fired by the Editor of The American Conservative (TAC)…

The Crucifixion of the Goddess, by Laurent Guyénot

“Love is civilization’s miracle”, wrote Stendhal in his insightful essay on Love.[1] He was talking about the high ideal of love elaborated in Western Europe, from twelfth-century courtly love to nineteenth-century romanticism. That ideal is pretty much dead, buried under the heaps of obscenities produced industrially every day by our degenerate sub-culture. As the fish…

Dispatches from the Race War, by Fred Reed

All cultures are equal. At least, as things are going, they soon will be. But couldn’t they be equal somewhere else? Month after month after month, surprising as sunrise, predictable as the value of pi, come the casualty reports documenting racial disaster. Details change. The substance does not. Gangs of American Africans beat whites into…

Boris Johnson’s Coup Is Eerily Reminiscent of Erdogan’s Rise to Power, by Patrick Cockburn

Britain is experiencing a slow-moving coup d’etat in which a right-wing government progressively closes down or marginalises effective opposition to its rule. It concentrates power in its own hands by stifling parliament, denouncing its opponents as traitors to the nation, displacing critics in its own ranks, and purging non-partisan civil servants. Some describe this as…

Let Them Howl, Boris!, by Pat Buchanan

Facing a Parliamentary majority opposed to a hard Brexit — a crashing out of the EU if Britain is not offered a deal she can live with — Boris Johnson took matters into his own hands. He went to the Queen at Balmoral and got Parliament “prorogued,” suspended, from Sept. 12 to Oct. 14. That’s…