Why Won’t the Democratic Candidates Move to the Left on Foreign Policy?

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The Democratic candidates have introduced a raft of radical progressive proposals on the domestic policy front, from Medicare for All to free public college to universal basic income. Yet that appetite for radicalism has been sorely lacking on the foreign policy front, with the candidates mostly mouthing the same noncommittal platitudes we’ve come to expect from cautious presidential contenders. Why is it that the policy area in which American presidents have the most power and the most freedom to shape world events is so often overlooked in our political campaigns? Atlantic contributor and CUNY professor Peter Beinart joins Mehdi Hasan to talk about why Democrats are so timid on foreign policy.
Transcript coming soon.
The post Why Won’t the Democratic Candidates Move to the Left on Foreign Policy? appeared first on The Intercept.

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Author: TheIntercept.com

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